Lonza

ScreenLight® Block

ScreenLight® Block is a new LONZA® BioActive Functional ingredient containing both Physalis alkekengi extract and beta-carotene, that provides a powerful defensive shield against the visible effects of different light and chemical based environmental stress factors on skin aging.

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Technical data sheet (TDS)
Product brochure
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Properties

Features And Benefits
Summary
Reduces the appearance of dark spots resulting in skin that appears more evenly toned
Reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles
Helps prevent increased melanin production from exposure to visible light and pollution
Helps to protect skin against the visible effects of light exposure by reducing the negative impact on cellular antioxidant potential (SOD2) elastin fibrillin MFAP-4 and MMP-1
Ingredient Claims
Organic
Natural or derived natural ingredient (ISO 16128)
End Use Claims
Anti-pollution
Anti-aging
Toning
Brightening
Antioxidant
Fine lines reduction
Blemish control
Wrinkle reduction
Protection
Strengthening
Regulatory Status
China Compliant
Certifications
COSMOS
Product Characteristics
Physical Form
Semi-solid
Color
Light Yellow to Orange
Odor
Characteristic
Appearance
Liquid-solid, oily
Formulation Conditions
Use Level
1-3%
Soluble in
Lipids
Insoluble in
Water

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Technical product information

Key Attributes
  • Reduces the appearance of dark spots, resulting in skin that appears more evenly toned (based on in vivo clinical data).
  • Reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles (based on self-perception data).
  • Helps prevent increased melanin production from exposure to visible light and pollution (based on ex vivo data).
  • Helps to protect skin against the visible effects of light exposure by reducing the negative impact on cellular antioxidant potential (SOD2), elastin, fibrillin, MFAP-4 and MMP-1 (based on ex vivo & in vitro data).
Consumer Insights

Consumers are continuously exposed to light, both outdoors and indoors. As they are increasingly using computers and portable electronic devices to stay connected to the world, consumers are gradually becoming aware how this behavior affects their skin through the light emitted from the screens of those devices. Specifically, blue light protection is an emerging trend, but must be seen in the context of established environmental stress factors that affect skin (and in particular skin aging) such as: pollution, smoke, UV, gas, particulates, heavy metals, ozone, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Another important factor is how markets are constantly changing, and how different generations rank the importance of skin aggressors differently as shown in the Mintel (2017) report table below.

ScreenLight™ Block

For those who use electronics to connect to their community and the World, now there is ScreenLight™ Block. ScreenLight™ Block is a new LONZA® BioActive Functional ingredient containing both Physalis alkekengi extract and beta-carotene, that provides a powerful defensive shield against the visible effects of different light and chemical based environmental stress factors on skin aging.

Component Description

Physalis alkekengi

The Genus Physalis (Solanaceae) includes approximately 90 species, that are widely grown in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Fruits of this Genus are grown or harvested by local populations for nutritional applications. Physalis alkekengi, popularly known as Chinese lantern, is a rhizomatous and perennial plant with bittersweet red-orange fruits and fruiting calyces Phytosterols have been identified as the predominant class of compounds found in species of the Genus Physalis. 15,16,17 Phytosterols make up a class of natural steroids found in plants that have a chemical structure similar to that of cholesterol. More than 250 phytosterols have been identified from botanical sources and are widely used in medicine and cosmetics for their antioxidant activity and ability to inhibit lipid  peroxidation In vitro studies19 showed that a mixture of phytosterols was able to act chemically as an antioxidant reducing lipid peroxidation and eliminating free radicals.20 Furthermore, it was shown that the ability of phytosterols to neutralize reactive oxygen species (ROS) can aid in disease prevention.

Beta-Carotene 

Carotenoids are natural pigments with a linear tetraterpenoid structure and are the major class of polyene compounds in biology. Typical examples28,29 include: Scientific studies have attributed an increase in the presence of free radicals in the skin to the degradation of cutaneous carotenoids from exposure to blue light, suggesting that carotenoids play a role in protecting skin from light induced oxidative damage to skin.30 These hypotheses are consistent with the well-known capability of long-chain polyene structures to quench electronically excited molecules. Because carotenoids are ingested by humans as part of a normal diet, scientific interest in their beneficial properties has extended to nutrition and medicine.

Efficacy Tests - Cell Antioxidant Capacity

Superoxide Dismutase (SOD2) protein expression was quantified as a measure of cellular antioxidant potential.
Method
Emulsions both with and without 3% ScreenLight™ Block were applied topically at a dose of 12mg/cm2 to ex vivo human skin explants and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The emulsions were subsequently rinsed off, reapplied, and the skin was stressed with visible light (5.5 mW/cm2). The emulsions were rinsed off again, reapplied and the skin samples were incubated for another 24 hours. The full protocol resulted in a cumulative stress dose of 100 J/cm2 visible light(100 J/cm2 VIS) over 72 hours. Baseline SOD2 expression, with and without visible light stressing, served as controls.
Following completion of treatment and stressing, the samples were rinsed, fixed with 4% Paraformaldehyde (PFA), sectioned, stained for SOD2 protein expression, and counterstained with DAPI. The resulting fluorescence signal was imaged and quantified using software provided by Leica, and results were analyzed for statistical significance using ANOVA. Dunnett’s test was used when the analysis of variance detected significant differences between groups. Results with p ≤ 0.05 were considered significant.
Results
Ex vivo skin samples that were stressed with a cumulative dose of 100 J/cm2 visible light, resulted in decreased expression of SOD2 compared to baseline levels (Fig. 1).The fluorescence due to SOD2   Consumer Product Ingredients expression was quantified for each experimental condition, and the results show that topical application of an emulsion containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block for 72 hours, significantly reduced the effect of visible light stress by 30% compared to the stressed control sample (Fig. 1, right). This effect was also significant, and greater than for the sample stressed with the same dose where a control emulsion was applied.

Efficacy test-Extracellular Matrix Structure and Organization

The dermis is composed of fibrous proteins, such as collagen, elastin and fibrillin, which provide strength and flexibility to the skin. These proteins are secreted by dermal fibroblasts and require a specific multifactorial cascade of proteins to assemble into functional bundles as shown in the figure below.34,35 It has further been shown that this highly complex protein assembly degrades with increasing chronological age, and with solar irradiation.36,37 The effect of light exposure on elastin, fibrillin, MFAP-4, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) protein expression can therefore been examined as a measure of extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity.

Method
The same protocol as described above for SOD2 was carried out, except in these experiments the full protocol resulted in a cumulative stress dose of 40 J/cm2 visible light over 72 hours. Baseline protein expression, with and without visible light stressing, served as controls. Samples were rinsed, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA), sectioned, stained for elastin protein expression, and counterstained with DAPI. The resulting fluorescence signal was imaged and quantified using software provided by Leica, and results were probed for statistical significance using ANOVA. Dunnett’s test was used when the analysis of variance detected significant differences between groups. Results with p ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. To assess the effect on fibrillin and MFAP-4 expression, emulsions both with and without 3% ScreenLight™ Block were applied to ex vivo skin samples, incubated and stressed with UVB light under the same general protocol as for visible light above. Sections were stained with anti-fibrillin or anti-MFAP-4 antibody and evaluated as described above for elastin. MMP-1 expression was evaluated in cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). Cells were incubated with 0.0012% ScreenLight™ Block, or controls, for 24 hours at 37°C, 5% CO2. Plates were then stressed with 4 J/cm2 UVA and incubated for an additional 48 hours at 37°C, 5% CO2. MMP-1 protein expression was quantified using ELISA, as per the manufacturer’s protocol, and signal measured on a microplate reader at 450 nm. MMP-1 levels were calculated in pg/mL relative to the standard curve, and results with p ≤ 0.05 were considered significant.

Results

Ex vivo skin samples that were stressed with a cumulative dose of 40 J/cm2 visible light, resulted in decreased expression of elastin compared to a control sample (Fig. 2). The fluorescence due to elastin expression was quantified for each experimental condition, and the results show that topical application of an emulsion containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block for 72 hours, eliminated the effect of visible light stress. Elastin protein levels were higher by 79% than the stressed control sample (Fig. 2, right). This effect was also significant to a sample stressed with the same dose, where a control emulsion was applied.

A similar effect was observed when analyzing the expression of fibrillin in ex vivo skin stressed with UVB light. Topical application of an emulsion containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block, resulted in a significant 150% increase in fibrillin protein as compared to the sample where a control emulsion was applied . This is clearly visible in the immunofluorescence images.

MFAP-4 is a protein described as critical to the proper organization of fibrillin microfibrils, and also proposed to play a role in protecting the skin from photodamage.38 Topical application of an emulsion containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block, resulted in a significant 92% increase in MFAP-4 protein levels, as compared to the control emulsion

MMP-1 expression levels have been shown to increase with increased chronological age and as a consequence of solar irradiation. MMP-1 degrades dermal and epidermal proteins and has been proposed to contribute to wrinkle formation.39

Consumer Product Ingredients
Cultured keratinocytes were stressed with 4 J/cm2 UVA, which led to a 34% increase in MMP-1 protein expression compared to the control (Fig. 5). In the presence of ScreenLight™ Block (0.0012%), the increase in MMP-1 expression was significantly reduced (-24%), maintaining it at nearly the level found in control cells.

The above results show that skin samples in the presence of ScreenLight™ Block exhibit increased expression of elastin, fibrillin and MFAP-4 proteins, which may benefit skin when stressed with light. In addition, dermal and epidermal degradation due to increased levels of MMP-1, may slow down in the presence of ScreenLight™ Block.

Efficacy test-Skin Pigmentation

Exposure of skin to solar radiation and/or environmental pollution, activates melanogenesis and results in increased pigmentation. Melanin content was examined in ex vivo human skin that had been stressed with visible light or cigarette smoke, and the effect of topical application of an emulsion containing ScreenLight™ Block.

Method

Emulsions, both with or without 3% ScreenLight™ Block were applied topically at a dose of 12
mg/cm2 to ex vivo human skin and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The emulsion was rinsed off, reapplied, and the skin was stressed with visible light (5.5 mW/cm2). The skin was again rinsed,emulsion applied and the skin samples were incubated for another 24 hours. Two complete cycles of light stressing and formula application were carried out, for a cumulative stress dose of 100 J/cm2 visible light over 72 hours. Endogenous melanin content, with and without stressing with visible light, served as controls. The sample was rinsed, fixed with 4% Paraformaldehyde (PFA), sectioned, and stained for melanin using the Fontana-Masson protocol.40 To simulate the effects of cigarette smoke, skin explants were incubated with or without 3% ScreenLight™ Block as described above. Samples were stressed, in a chamber, with the smoke of two lit cigarettes for one hour. The samples were then further incubated and processed as described above.

Results

Ex vivo skin which was stressed with a cumulative dose of 100 J/cm2 visible light resulted in visibly greater melanin content, when comparing to the baseline control (Fig. 6). The presence of topically applied control emulsion did not appreciably affect the increased pigmentation response. The formulation containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block, did appear, qualitatively, to maintain melanin levels more similar to baseline levels.

Similarly, when skin explant samples were stressed with cigarette smoke, as a model for pollution, an increase in melanin staining was observed in stressed samples compared to the baseline control. Although topical application of a control formulation may have prevented melanin content increase to some extent, the effect is dramatically increased in skin which has been stressed to 3% ScreenLight™ Block (Fig. 7). It does appear that a formulation containing ScreenLight™ Block may prevent melanin content increase following skin exposure to visible light and pollution, as exemplified by cigarette smoke.

Efficacy Test-Effects of ScreenLight™ Block on Skin In Vivo

Given recent evidence of the effects of visible light on skin appearance, a clinical study was conducted to evaluate an emulsion containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block versus a control emulsion.

Methods

A total of 34 subjects, divided into two groups, were given either Cream A (3% ScreenLight™ Block) or Cream B (control emulsion) and instructed to use twice daily at home for 28 ± 2 days. Subjects were female, aged 28 – 45, and were daily users of computer/mobile/tablets. Subjects maintained a diary and answered a questionnaire on perceived efficacy of the formulation after 14 and 28 days of use. In addition, subjects were evaluated by a dermatologist, pigmentation on discrete facial areas were measured (Mexameter MX 18, Courage & Khazaka), and facial images were taken using a Visia CR imaging system (Canfield Scientific, Inc.) at days T0, T14 and T28. Exploratory data analyses (summary tables and graphs) were performed. The comparison between products was performed using Student t-test with bilateral hypothesis. The response variable was the difference with initial time-point (T14-T0 and T28-T0). The confidence level used on the comparative analysis was 95%. The analysis software packages were MINITAB 14 and XLSTAT 2018.

Results

After 28 days of product use, Mexameter readings indicated that Cream A (3% ScreenLight™ Block) was able to significantly reduce the appearance of dark spots (Fig. 8a) and provide an overall appearance of brighter skin compared to Cream B (control emulsion) (Fig. 8b)

In addition, a significant number of subjects perceived a reduction in the appearance of facial lines and wrinkles with the formula containing 3% ScreenLight™ Block, as compared to the control emulsion (87% vs 58% respectively). Typical results are shown in the picture below:

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